Does Your Love Language Influence Your Valentine’s Day Expectations?

Do our Valentine’s Day expectations fall in line line with our love language, or do they have more to do with the seriousness of our relationship and how long we’ve been in that relationship?

To help with finding the answer to my initial question,  I gathered the opinions of seven individuals from different backgrounds and lifestyles, and these were the results.

Acts of Service –The 5 Love Languages describes this love language as doing anything you can do to ease the burden of responsibilities

My husband I have been married for a decade (that sounds like a long time) and as I think back through the years, my idea of the perfect Valentine’s Day gift has changed on a pretty steady rate. My love language is acts of service, so on the occasions that I ask for gifts I’m specific about what I want. I don’t put a lot of pressure on my husband on Valentine’s Day, cause I’m a Daddy’s Girl. I like for my husband to be our girls’ Valentine, because I expect to be my dad’s.

Words of Affirmation –The 5 Love Languages describes this love language as Doing something for your spouse that you know they would
like.

#1 Interviewee  -this male lover of affirmations has been married for a little over ten years, and even though on a normal basis Valentine gifts aren’t really a big deal for him, there are situationally motivated one-offs that prompt him to ask for something specific, yet simple. He usually buys practical, useful gifts.

#2 Interviewee -my second interviewee likes to be affirmed as well. This single male explained that gifts aren’t really a big deal, he’s always associated Valentine’s Day as a day for women. However, he pays attention to what his lady talks about and usually buys gifts that knock it out of park.

Quality Time –The 5 Love Languages describes this love language as giving your spouse undivided attention. Talking and listening.

#3 Interviewee -Married for three years, this male interviewee likes undivided attention. He’s not particular about the gifts he receives, and  feels that it’s the thought that counts. He appreciates whatever he’s given. He loves to plan romantic date nights for him and his boo.

#4 Interviewee -Valentine’s Day is still a really big deal for this recently engaged bride-to-be. Since her love language is quality time, she totally expects something romantic that’s geared for couples. Gifts aren’t necessary for her when time can be spent and memories can be made.

#5 Interviewee-Eight years of marriage and two children later, this working mom looks forward to a nice evening of quiet time with her man. Even though she loves quality time, on Valentine’s Day she is always over the moon to receive Valentine candy.

Gifts –The 5 Love Languages describes this love language as a gift says, “He was thinking about me. Look what he got for me.”

#6 Interviewee -After twenty-two years of marriage, all she wants is for her husband to buy something that costs more then “$199.99”. She explained that yes, she does like receiving gifts, but around the fifteenth year, she longed for something that wasn’t purchased from a cheesy valentine day jewelry commercial.

#7 Interviewee -With a little more than two years of marriage under her belt, this interviewee said, and I quote. “He better give me something, and I’m not talking about one long-stemmed rose either.”

Both of the ladies explained that when it comes to flowers, yes they are nice, but there is no need to spend an excessive amount of money on them. They’d much rather prefer a more bang for your buck bouquet. After all, flowers die after a week.


Physical Touch –The 5 Love Languages includes holding hands, hugging, kissing, sexual intercourse, are all expressions of love.

No one fell into this category, or maybe they were just too shy to share.

What is your love language and how do it correlate to your expectations on Valentine’s Day? Please share in the comments section.

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