VH1’s TATTOO EXPERT KATRINA ‘KAT TAT’ JACKSON TO MAKE SPECIAL APPEARANCE AT SECOND ANNUAL “PAINTING WITH THE PRO’S”

The NFL Players Association Will Hold A Special Event During Super Bowl Week Where Kat Tat Will Lead An Instructional Painting Class For Minneapolis High School Students.

Katrina ‘Kat Tat’ Jackson made her mark as an artist at while still in high school at the age of 16! Read more about her story HERE!

Katrina ‘Kat Tat’ Jackson, ​Super bowl-winning ​defensive back ​Duane Starks​, former ​Washington Redskins​ All-pro kicker ​Chip Lohmiller​, and several other former NFL Players including ​Brandon Archer, Peter Campion, Cliff Crosby, Omar Gaither, Bradie James, Jon Melander,​ and many more!

WHAT: Second annual “Smocks and Jocks: Painting With the Pros,” a special community event hosted by the ​NFLPA’s Professional Athletes Foundation​ and ​Painting With A Twist

 Friday February 2, 2018 9:30AM – 11:30AM

Roseville Area High School

1240 County Road B2 W, Roseville, MN 55113

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Katrina Jackson – The Softer Side of ‘Kat Tat’


I’m literally just a regular girl from a regular neighborhood -tried to go off to college, but found my passion in art and tattooing, and I took a risk to make that my career and I made it happen. ”
-Katrina (Kat Tat) Jackson

Meet the ARtist

If you were asked to provide an opinion about the artwork of Painter, Katrina Jackson, you may have to search the name, but what if you were asked about that tat-girl, Kat Tat? Kat Tat, from VH1’s hit reality series Black Ink Crew Chicago? Or Kat Tat, the tattoo artist who went viral after tattooing a portrait of a vintage burlesque dancer on her own thigh? Jackson is an artist -a painter and tattoo artist. A fact solidified over a decade ago when the, now, 27 year old entered an art show at the age of 16.

Jackson recalls the childhood experience that helped shape she today.

“I’ve always kind-of possessed the talent of being able to draw. When I was 16, I think, I was in junior in high school and one of my drawings won first place in Illinois, and they flew me across the country to Florida to compete in nationals with like 3,000 other students around the world. That showed me that I could really do something with this art. If I can be in high school and one of my sketches sends me across the country; That shows me that I have some serious talent.”

Flying to Florida served as an eye opener to her talent, but a broken heart would spur on her love for painting and tattoo art and tattooing -earning her the nickname Tat Girl.

“Going into my senior year is when I got the interest in tattooing, and when I really stepped out and started finding myself. I had this boyfriend that I was madly in love with.  I thought my life would just be being this guys wife and my senior year in high school is when I had my first break up -my first heartbreak.

from breakup to breaktrhough

So,  after the breakup I really started to find who I am and explore things that I want to do, and that’s actually when I got my grades up. It was just like ‘Ok!, Let me focus on this art a little bit. Let me see where this will take me,” she says

Creativity spurred on through the pain of love loss. Imagine that, and who can relate? By college, Jackson’s interest in tattoos grew from paper sketching  art work for classmates future  tattoos, to freshman-year dorm room “skin work.” Her work, again,  proved itself and Jackson became known around campus as “Tat Girl!”

Jackson found her love and passion for painting and tattooing taking over and her grades quickly fell to the back burner yet again. On the other hand,  due to her determination and work ethic, her artistry was taking her to places beyond her wildest dreams.

“I tried to go off to college, but found my passion in art and tattooing and I took a risk to make that my career and I made it happen. I don’t really believe in being a starving artist. It may not even be art that’s your passion, but whatever your passion is, it’s important to go out and chase and it and really make it work for you! I’m out here trying to get it and inspire girls that are just like me. I’m just a very very hard working artist,” she says.

2015 was an explosive year for Jackson, showcasing two shows at Miami’s Art Basel and making her television debut as part of the 9Mag Tattoo Studio crew on Black Ink Crew Chicago.

She explains what it was like having two exhibits in Miami’s Art basel and the inspiration brought on by that experience.

“It was great! It’s every artists dream to go to Art Basel and showcase. For me to have two shows in one year it felt amazing. It made me feel like I was doing something right to have my paintings show across the country and it was such a nice, classy event. It’s just another step forward in my career.”

therapy through art

Art is therapeutic for most, Jackson shares with us which creative style is more therapeutic when comparing painting and tattooing.

“The best way to explain it is, with tattooing I’m providing a service, so it’s always that -not even pressure, because it is what I do, but you have to make sure that it’s perfect. You’re providing a service for that person you’re taking their idea and bringing it to life. With painting, it’s mine. It’s whatever I want to do. So if I want to get away from tattooing and do something grip [sic]. If I want to sip on a little wine while I’m painting and see what I come up with it’s a little more relaxing.Tattooing is more my second nature, painting is less pressure -you know, I don’t have to worry about if I mess up.”

keeping it sexy

Jackson explains the importance of sensual and sexual artistic expression, and owning it.

“I think that women are beautiful and I think that it’s ok for women to own their sexuality and feel beautiful and just be feminine and sexy. Me being a tattoo artist, I want to change the stereotype of tattoo artists and the whole tattoo industry, cause people think biker and edgy. So my latest collection was painting women with tattoos and still making them look soft and exude sexiness and focus on their beauty and show that they can wear these tattoos without distracting their beauty.”

Jackson has to proven herself as an artist since high school, quickly rising to fame with 9Mag and Black Ink Crew Chicago. With fame comes with money, power and influence. Jackson details how fame and the experiences that come along with it have affected her artistically?

fame, focus and the future

“I have stayed super super focused while still being transparent on TV, like I go through some stuff on TV. But when we got this opportunity I was like, ‘I’m gonna make it. I’m going to work my ass off during this short opportunity, cause TV can be here today and gone tomorrow.’  So it has put me in full throttle -not the pressure but the platform made it very important for me to put out my best work. It really pushed me and it showed me what I’m capable of and It’s enabled me to work to my full potential, it’s even shown too. When I tell you I go through some stuff on this show, but when I put out my work people don’t care. They’re like, ‘Yeah, she’s this, but she can tattoo.’ Or ‘oh yeah, she acts like this, but she can paint her ass off.’ So my talent overshadows it.”

As for the future, Jackson will continue tattooing portraits and black and gray realism, but plans on learning a new-school “neo traditional” type method of tattooing.  And if you want a “tat” from Kat?

“It’s very easy, just email Kat@kattatgirl.com, you can google Kat Black Ink, and my website and everything will pop up and there are direct links, and everything will take you to my email. On Instagram I’m @kattatgirl. Just send me an email and you’ll get an automatic response with everything you need, then just decide how you gonna book.”

Kat’s latest paintings, modeling pictures and her portfolio can also be found at www.kattatgirl.com.

All pictures courtesy of www.kattatgirl.com and @kattatgirl

Makeup and Beyond -A Chat With Celebrity MUA Frederick ‘Fred4Face’ Saunders

“I love every aspect of being a makeup artist, even the clients with bad attitudes. There is nothing that I would rather do. I feel like I wake up and breath makeup.” -Frederick Sanders

@Fred4Face

There aren’t many people who can honestly say, “I love what I do,” but there are a few and celebrity MUA, Frederick Sanders is one of them. His looks have graced red carpets, album and magazine covers, and been seen center stage on host of celebrities; Regina Hall, Shirley Cesar, MC Lyte, The Clark Sisters, Robyn Dixon, Avery Sunshine and Tamela Mann to name a few and is known for his “anointed hands.” I caught up and spoke to Sanders about who he is on a personal level, his career as a makeup artist  and what the future holds for “Fred4Face“.

Photo Gallery Credit: @Fred4Face

PC: @shebatty

On a typically warm, fall night in Dallas at the swanky Design District apartment skyrise clubhouse amoungst outstanding views while enjoying the sounds of DJ Luqwon, I had the pleasure of watching Saunders work his magic on “The Chain Breaker” herself, Speaker, Author and Philanthropist, Dr. Catrina Pullum.

“I’m the guy that’s behind the scenes. People know my work and name, but not necessarily my face,” he explains as he enters the clubhouse modestly, charmed and flattered that the Concierge recognized him on sight and greeted him with excitement. Seems like he’d  set up and was ready to roll by the time he finished that sentence.

SheBatty: I read that you were preparing for law school and walked into MAC and got hired on the spot.

Fred Saunders: “This is true, this is true.”

So have you always been artistic or were you practicing makeup at that time, or do you just have it?

“I’d like to think that I just have it. However, I did grow up being the only boy in a house full of sisters. So I think it just kind of fell on me -I inherited it, if you will, I was the youngest and the only boy. Seeing my great-grandmother, my grandmother, my mother and all of my sisters, you know, it kind of helped along. But I’d never had any desires to be a makeup artist.

I was always artistic. Years ago, as a child, I thought I wanted to be a fashion designer. I would draw clothes and -you know, really try to sketch things out, then I moved to being a cartoonist. So, I feel like -I’d like to say I did have the artistic side, I just never knew that I would develop it as a makeup artist.”

Those things sound so far from lawyer, but I guess we’re all multi-faceted. Did you know that makeup was your calling upon being hired at MAC?

“It was after, at that moment it was just a summer job for me. I was a school teacher, so my summers were free and I wanted to do something fun that I could do and not have to think about, and I gathered that it would just be something fun -you know, something I would just kind of learn and leave behind or maybe something I could do on the side. I never envisioned being a full fledged artist.”

Now that you are an artist, what do you love about it?

“I love every aspect of being a makeup artist, even the clients with bad attitudes — there is nothing that I would rather do. I feel like I wake up and breath makeup.”

PC: @Fred4Face

 What’s your favorite bold looks that you’ve created or the most fun?

“The most fun bold look….that would have to be on one of my clients    who was very conservative, she did not really allow me to step out of the  box, but I just kind of like –really, just kind of did my own thing one day.  And it ended up being a cover shoot for a CD. And the CD picture went  viral.”

PC: @Fred4Face

You are great at creating classic red carpet looks. Do you like to step outside of that and do bold looks?

“Absolutely! I’ve done everything from fashion makeup, to red carpet beauty makeup, to body painting to face painting for halloween. I’ve even gone as far as to do female impersonators, so it’s really like a big circle.”

You just told me that you had a client who was conservative, and you had a little fun and it worked. Do you often do that -play up looks and have fun?

PC: @shebatty

I often do what I want -to be honest. And I hope none of my clients see this. I let them tell me what they believe they want, and I take their idea and make it my own. So, if somebody tells me, ‘I just want like, six colors on my eye.’ And I know that you’re not patient enough for me to put six colors on your eye and blend them down, then what I’ll do is i’ll do a simulation of what you want. And you might believe that you have six colors, but at the end of the day it may only be two. And that’s just real, because a lot of times I feel like most clients sit in the chair and tell you what they think they want, but then when they actually figure out what they really want, they’re like, ‘Oh, that’s not what I wanted.’ So to save myself some time, and save them a headache -you know, let me just combine the two.”

What’s your go to brand?

“My go to brand is actually Temptu, believe it or not. I do have a lot of things that I use. I can’t say that I use a certain foundation or a certain concealer, because I generally just use whatever I can find a good match with for color and whatever just works in my bag.”

What’s your go to budget brand?

“My go to budget brand…I’m actually enjoying, believe it or not, Kiss Cosmetics Professional and you can find that in the beauty supply store. They have some great longwear lipsticks and they have some great brow pencils -I’m actually using a brow pencil right now by Kiss Cosmetics.”

What’s the one product that we can always find in your bag?

“One product that you can always find in my bag, is my Temptu Airbrush Machine. That is my must-have. I travel with it everywhere I go. I find that when I’m working with gentlemen, they prefer the airbrush, because it doesn’t give you that makeupy [sic] look. But it’s still nice and natural enough that they can walk outside and nobody would be like ‘Oh my gosh, are you wearing makeup?’ so, that’s my must have.”

PC: @shebatty

What advice would you give aspiring MUAs?

“Be able to listen, be able to learn and never stop learning. Even at my age now and the number of years I have under my belt as a makeup artist, I’m still open to learning new things. So, always be open to learning new things.”

How do you feel social media has affected the industry?

“Social Media has definitely impacted the industry in so many different ways. I think it’s more so negatively, because there are so many people who feel like because they have two brushes and a pencil, they can say, “I”m a makeup artist” because they know how to draw their brows on. However, not necessarily knowing the art behind it, where you actually have to put in some work and understand, like other peoples skin types and other peoples structures and things of that nature.”

fred beyond the makeup

PC: @Fred4Face

Who are you beyond the makeup?

“Beyond the makeup….I am a mentor, I am a father, I am a friend, I’m a brother. I’m a Dillard [University] grad -hello!  I speak three languages: Spanish, French and German. I was a foreign language major in college most people don’t know that about me and that’s pretty much a fun fact.”

What are your plans for 2018?

“I’m taking bigger faith walks. I’m actually stepping out of my box and trying to do something on a bigger level. Somethings that I never thought that I would even dream of accomplishing. Stepping out on the waters a little bit.

Always be on the lookout for me. Cause if you sleep on me you’re gonna look up and be like ‘Oh, he’s up there!”

Visit Fred4Face for booking information and to see more Sanders work.

Meet Tashara ‘TJ’ Robinson, POWER MOM!

After more than a decade of “living the dream”, Dallas native, stay-a-home mother of four and wife, TaShara ‘TJ’ Robinson found herself in an unfamiliar space.

“To make a long story short, I ended up filing for divorce after 19 years of marriage,” she says the discussion about her contribution to the newly released POWER Moms book begins.

Who signed up for this

“I met my husband at Texas A&M University and we dated for a few years. Got married, and I decided to be a stay-at-home mom -we had already had the conversation and decided that if we had kids, I’d stay home and raise the kids, and at the time I felt like that was the best decision for me. I wanted to just, you know, be a mom -be a good mom, and I wanted to be a good wife as well. And you know, even as noble as that desire sounded, I found that I still had to deal with real life and a real marriage,” she says.

steps to overcoming

It’s easy to feel alone when faced with adversity, but Robinson explains that, “I find that I have an -unfortunately, it’s not an uncommon story. So, I am encouraging people who have experienced any type of loss. My loss, in particular, was a divorce. So I’m just sharing all the wisdom I have learned,” she says.

”There was a lot of journaling where I was processing a lot of decisions that I knew I would have to make. The journaling, for me, is what helped me come to that decision and even after the divorce, there was still a lot of adjustment with my children and family and friends and -wow, I felt like I just had get it out,” she says.

Through the POWER Moms book, Robinson provides a glimpse into what she had to overcome and shows that, “Hey, everything can look good, but yet there are still some difficulties,” she says.

judging a book by its cover

“The years leading up to that divorce, and, even now it’s been two and a half years, I’ve had a lot of introspection time where I actually had to decide for myself how I wanted my life to go and run and operate,” she says.

She recalls being compared to the Obamas from those on the outside looking in and says, “I thought to myself that they [the Obamas] would be mad with y’all comparing us to them! No, ma’am!” Because everything and everyone who looks good on paper is good, right?

“To be clear, the 19 years weren’t all bad. We have four beautiful children who are emotionally healthy and physically healthy that I’m extremely proud of,” she says.

in the end, it’s a win

Be assured that her story does not end there. The best part of Overcoming obstacles and adversity is most definitely the Win!  In reflection of the journey, and while working on POWER Moms, Robinson came to realizations and discovered Empowering things about herself.

“Obstacles act as an astringent, they bring things out of you. I realized that I operated in a lot of fear. I was afraid…of a lot of things. Like, I’ve been married for 19 years and I haven’t worked in so long. How am I going to make it? I have four kids! How am I going to do that? Can I do this? I don’t  know! So, the fear and the self-doubt I dealt with, but what I also found me,” she says.

“Like, ‘Ok, you might be scared, but we g’on [sic] figure it out!’ That’s what this drew out of me so, I’m not afraid to move past that fear anymore. That’s where I am right now and that’s what that obstacle drew out of me,” she says.

The P.O.W.E.R Moms book  is a compilation of stories of by 12 mothers who exemplify P.O.W.E.R., an acronym for Persevere Overcome Win Empower and Restore. Read more of Tashara’s story, and for book signings, additional POWER Mom events and to purchase your copy, visit www.powermombook.com/t-robinson

Contact www.phenixx.com to book POWER Mom Co-Author Tashara Robinson.

To learn more about Tashara (TJ) Robinson and any upcoming projects visit www.tasharatjrobinson.com.

All photos provided curtesy of Tashara Robinson and Powermomsbook.com

A NIGHT FOR THE STARS AWARDS THE BEST IN BEAUTY, ATTRACTS NATIONAL ATTENDANCE

On Sunday December 3, 2017, Trish Hill, a Dallas-based philanthropist, entrepreneur, and owner of Salon N’vious, in partnership with The Trish Hill Foundation, hosted the 6th annual A Night for the Stars beauty industry awards show and gala, attracting national attendance from the best and the brightest in the beauty industry including: Naja Rickette (WE TV’s L.A. Hair, Celebrity Nail Artist for Lady Gaga, Mary J. Blige, and others), Paul Mitchell School, Bronner Bros., Dana Harper (NBC’s The Voice, Season 11), LuLu Amin (DFW Beauty Guide), Christian Craven (award-winning men’s fashion blogger), Tyzza Macias (top local beauty entrepreneur, Founder of Factory Glam), and Jaleesa Charisse Howard (award-winning fashion and natural hair blogger), and more.

The 6th annual awards show was emceed by Titia Owens (local media personality and Founder of Where Are You? Homeless Outreach), and featured a GRAMMYs-inspired awards presentation, men and women’s fashion show, and the honoring of a cancer makeover recipient, Roz Bratton McGill as the inaugural awardee of a head to toe makeover through the Trish Hill Foundation – a foundation that provides donated and/or low cost beauty services in the DFW metroplex to cancer patients and survivors in order to positively boost their self-esteem and provide hope.

 

“I’ve been to the GRAMMY’s and the VMA’s,” celebrity Nail Artist and WE TV’s Naja Rickette wrote on her Instagram, “[but] in all sincerity A Night for the Stars by Trish Hill in Dallas is at a similar production value. Check it out next year.”

 

A full list of the 2017 Night for the Stars Award Winners are:

Best Barber: Monica Wells-Phillips
Best MakeUp Artist: Keenya Madison
Best Nail Tech: Icon Nails
Best Hair Show: Bronner Bros.
Best Hairstylist: Cee Rich
Best Esthetician: Dawn Jackson
Best Educator: Freddie Jones AKA Freddie J
Best Salon: Good Hair Day
Best Fashion Stylist: Andre Terry
Best Beauty School: Paul Mitchell Dallas
Best Magazine: Cosign Magazine
Best Product Sales Rep: Raymond Owens
Best Oral Surgeon: Dr. Faith Oliver
Shining Star 2017: Orianna Jenkins (DFW Teen Fashion Week)
Shining Star 2017: Kaye Flewellen
Trish Hill Foundation Cancer Makeover Awardee: Roz Bratton McGill

PHOTOS: Used Courtesy of: Trish Hill